Editorial

PEACE MONITORS SHOULD RESPECT THEIR MANDATES

The reminder of Bishop Stephen Ameyo Martin Mulla of the Catholic Church to politicians of Pope Francis’ kiss during the trying moment of hunting for peace should be taken with the stride it deserves. The climax of the search for peace which had eluded the country far too long was being in the center of concern to both local and international players. It had drawn global attention and the political leadership took the initiative to bring peace home to stay. With the world’s attention now being focused on the implementation process, there have been obstacles mostly created by monitors mandated to oversee the peace process at the expense of the population and the country. It is not in the interest of anyone to lose the track of the process. It must be accepted that before the main signatories pointed out the shortfalls by the peace monitor bodies, the latter remained mum and almost convinced the entire country that they were busy doing something. This was not to be since the main political parties in different reactions exposed the truth and their frustration to meet the peace agreement deadline. The exposures brought to life the true position of some of the peace monitor institutions and other key players on what their real intention was. Now that they are promising to have all parties to the agreement back in the fold, this time around they should be genuinely concerned as end time for the transitional government of national unity is coming to an end and an election is expected by next year. Those involved should honestly articulate their mandated agenda without any hidden agenda which seems to have been the cause of all delays and implementation of the agreement which they have been accused of and which they have not denied leaving an open doubt in the minds of the public.

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