Editorial

CESSATION OF HOSTILITIES SHOULD BE RESPECTED

Odongo Odoyo

By Malek Arol Dhieu (Guest)

When cessation of hostilities was signed to put an end to the violence that had included vulnerable people such as children and women, violence was thought to cease from both sides of the parties in agreement. Indeed it was at first respected, leading to the restoration of hopes and assurance that the revitalized peace agreement would get implemented fully. During those days the status of the agreement was still not known, the cessation of hostilities was up-to-date, but when it became known that the agreement was getting implemented, the violation of the agreement on the cessation of hostilities gets violated day in, day out. To date, fighting takes place in areas of Upper Nile, Unity and Jonglei states among officials of different political affiliations which sends an undeniable message that the cessation of hostilities is being violated by the signatories to the agreement. If the violation happens as a result of seeking or widening the channels of consideration in the allocation of positions to different signatories, then it should not reach a level where it draws the attention of the international community. You know how South Sudan is recovering from bad perception by the whole world, and so, anything that revokes the growing recognition worldwide should be dealt with by all by implementing the agreement fully as the only guarantee that would bring South Sudan to share a dining table with the rest of the countries in the world. There are countries up to now still saying, South Sudan will not implement the peace agreement it signed among the warring parties, and therefore, such bewitching countries should be taught a lesson by respecting the cessation of hostilities, leading to full implementation of the agreement.

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