By Rose Keji Benjamin

Business communities in Terekeka have resorted to river transport due to poor condition of roads between Juba and their state.

In a statement to Juba Monitor, Terekeka State’s Minister of Information, Philip Ladu, said the roads were now impassable as a result of heavy rains that had made the movement of people and goods to the area difficult.

He disclosed that the road connecting Terekeka with Juba was in bad shape, but added the state Ministry of Physical Infrastructure was working around the clock to repair the road.

“Passengers and traders nowadays use motor boats to transport fish and local produce from Terekeka to Juba, and also goods such: sugar, maize flour, cooking oil and others from Juba to Terekeka,” Mr. Ladu revealed.

“The road which is in bad shape now, is the only one that connects Terekeka with the national capital Juba, and there is need for mobilization of resources for fixing it,” he added.

Mr. Ladu said lack of machinery had contributed immensely to the delay of roads’ construction, and divulged that government’s and commercial vehicles no longer move on this road (between Juba and Terekeka) because it was impassable.

He added that potholes on the road were the major problems that could not allow heavy vehicles to pass but said the state’s leadership was committed to resolve the issue, lamenting that they had been incapacitated by the economic crisis, which had affected the whole country.

The minister said Terekeka was one of the states that had been affected by hunger which had claimed a number of lives.

“Shortages of basic commodities in the market in Terekeka have led to price hike that caused hunger and insecurity in the area,” Ladu said.

Mary Keji, a business woman who imports groundnuts from Terekeka to Juba decried the condition of the road. Ms. Keji said for one to travel from Terekeka to Juba, he or she must spend a number of hours on the motor boat, which she said was better than land transport. “We travel on the river without difficulties,” Ms. Keji said.

She appealed to the government to repair the road in order to ease the movement of goods and passengers. “We are affected because there are difficulties regarding transportation of large quantities of goods,” Keji added.