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MSF boss in Juba to assess health situation

 

MSF Director General, Milke Manders (Photo Kitab A Unango)

By Kitab A Unango

The General Director of Medicins Sans Frontiers (MSF) is in the country to assess medical needs and pay solidarity to the people of South Sudan.

Nelke Manders, MSF General Director arrived to Juba on Monday for a seven day official visit.

She is expected to meet with national and state government officials including foreign affairs minister.

She will also tour some parts of the country where MSF implements its health projects among others, Lankien. And Protection Sites of Civilians in Bentiu.

Speaking to Journalists yesterday in Juba, Manders said she was concerned about the health situation in the country.

She pointed out that it was very important for her to visit the country because South Sudan is their biggest healthcare mission area in the world.

She said the health situation in the country was alarming adding that maternal and infant’s mortality rates were among the highest health issues that citizens are facing in the country.

MSF boss further said her organization believes in global solidary with vulnerable population in countries like South Sudan adding that she was unhappy to see that much emergency healthcare was still needed in country.

“I am sad to visit south Sudan because after thirty five years still a lot of emergency humanitarian health care was still needed here. And to come to the country where suffering of your brothers and sisters is so incredibly big also pains me to be sincerely,” Manders said.

Manders reiterated that she was concerned that much of the healthcare services to over one million displaced persons were being provided by the NGOs.

She added that she hoped the government would be able to provide healthcare to its own people if she visits the country for the second time.

According to Manders, South Sudan has been the biggest area of MSF’s healthcare mission. She said the organization has treated over one million patients among them were over three hundred thousand children with various cases in 2018.

In the same year MSF operated at least 3, 333 patients with violence- related injuries and treated over 10, 000 malnutrition cases as well assisted over 14 000 mothers during delivery.

 

 

 

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