By Sheila Ponnie

The second edition of Made in South Sudan exhibition to showcase goods produced in the country began this Monday and will run till Friday at the Nyakuron Cultural Centre. This year’s exhibition is under the theme “Together Promoting South Sudan Business and Industrial Development.”

The exhibition was organised by the Ministry of Trade and Industry in partnership with Private Sectors and the UN Development programme.

Upon reaching the exhibition hall, the public is immediately welcomed by various items like beads, paste, fish coolers, lulu/shea butter, dry okra, cabbages, tomatoes, watermelons, silver fish, hand-made crafts shoes, sofa sets, and mirrors, among others.

The third day of the exhibitions has attracted over forty exhibitors from different parts of the country and companies such as Lulu life products, Agroganics limited, Global group, Vink energy, Kuruku wate food processing centre, Green and St. Kizito Women Multipurpose Co-operation showcasing their products in Nyakuron Culture Centre in Juba.

At the occasion, the Director for Trade Fairs and Exhibition, Christine Ijino Oyenak called upon South Sudanese to invest in what they have.

“The only thing we have in South Sudan at the moment is business opportunity. The only opportunity we can offer the world at the moment is investment opportunity in all sectors that we have. We have Agriculture sector and industrial sector.

Oyenak however dismissed allegations that water melon and other food products cannot grow in South Sudan.

“It is not true now with this exhibition, it shows us that everything can grow in South Sudan and we have land for farming and it is something we can be proud of because all our foods are organic food without fertilizers,” she said.

The aim of the exhibition is to promote locally made products in the country.

“In fact we want to showcase the products we are producing in the country and even the services that we offer to the world.  Our people also need experience in other places and also they can learn from others too,” she added.

Oyenak concluded that South Sudanese should be proud of their products and the nation and they have to encourage their own business sectors instead of depending on oil alone.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Skip to toolbar