The clearance procedures at the Nimule border point has retarded Juba power rehabilitation project, the Undersecretary in the Ministry of Electricity and Dams, Lawrence Loku Moyu said.

Earlier, the African Development Bank (AfDB) approved $14.57 million supplementary loan for South Sudan’s power project that was intended to rehabilitate and expand electricity distribution network in the capital.

Moyu said most of the valuable equipment needed for the China Power International Limited to do the work have been over delayed under clearance at Nimule border.

The official called for speedy clearance of the equipment. “The electric poles and transmitters were supposed to be replaced by the China Power to allow sustainable distribution of power in Juba, but the clearance of the equipment has been over delayed at Nimule.”

He added that the wooden electric poles that were constructed 11 years ago have become weak to resist strong wind. “They keep falling whenever it is raining,” he said. “They will continue to destroy lives and property of innocent citizens”.

On Sunday last week, a heavy rainfall broke down several electric poles around Juba University; four people were killed and several others injured.

Moyu urged the authorities at Nimule to cooperate, saying the delay of the equipment and the two cars belonging to the China Power has slowed down the work.

He reiterated that the contract was scheduled to last only for 18 months, saying the vehicles that were supposed to start removing the poles are still being held at the border.

The Undersecretary expressed sympathy for the relatives who lost their dear ones after they were hit by the electric poles due to heavy rain fall.

Meanwhile the Director General in the Ministry of Electricity and Dams Faustino Tombe Yugusuk said as long as corruption continue to exist there will never be a progress in the country.

He said there is no any single budget for buying fuel in order to run power in the city.

He urged the citizens to cooperate and remain united so as to have sustainable peace in the country.

By Rose Keji Benjamin