By Tunde Obileye

The Merriam Webster dictionary defines resilience as an ability to recover from or adjust easily to misfortune or change. Today’s article focuses on change rather than misfortune and the ability for facilities managers to walk through the change process undefeated, and the learning and growth that accompanies the change.

In today’s society, resilient facilities have become increasingly important and valuable, especially in the context of current economic downturn, and the ability of managers to ensure their businesses are not put in jeopardy but maintain high standards, and people are still willing to trust them. Similar to sustainability and high-performance strategies, achieving resilient facilities should not be seen as an extra but a work in progress.

Facilities managers are a great part of business. They are the impact required for the business to hold through during difficult times. The bond of trust built over time surely comes into place when external or unexpected issues arise.

Truth be told, imparting resilience is not a onetime thing. It comes from a series of training and hard work. Whatever system is in place should not derail Facilities Management personnel from doing a good job, because their efforts are a measurement of the business and also shows the extent to which FM can withstand change or misfortune. FM is evolving and resilience will be required to stay on top of the various issues that may arise. With more corporate organizations outsourcing FM, the pressure to deliver cannot be overstated. Economic realities have also added to the pressure. The question, therefore is, to what extent are facilities managers willing to put in additional work or bounce back and take a stand to make excellence a priority? A willingness to do these things is the true definition of resilience.

Change is inevitable, therefore the flexibility and willingness to adjust goes on a long way not just for the business but also for the clients and end users of the facilities.

Can resilience be measured? The answer is not so straightforward – ensuring excellence even during difficult times, and ability to bounce back when things get bad, will be some measurements.  It is, however, not a one off- process of success; it is a constant work and an instilled value that forms the backbone for every business in time of change. Resilience can occur due to financial changes caused, for instance, by budgetary control or shift in management decision.

Ways to Impart Resilience in Facilities Management

1.Employees should be trained in such a way that unforeseen circumstances will not derail or create a setback in the business.

2.There should always be a fall back plan so as to avoid chaos in term of financial hollow.

3.Quality should be the norm as basis for rendering services such that negative factors do not affect it, in anyway.

There will always be downtime in business but the ability to make its end product of good delivery as promised is something facilities managers should not compromise. End user satisfaction comes first; regardless of changes surrounding the business.

 

 

Skip to toolbar